Tea

Afternoon Tea

If serving tea for a group it is worth brewing a pot. Loose-leaf tea will taste best. A second pot of hot water should be provided to dilute over-brewed tea if necessary. If a waiter places a teapot on the table without pouring the tea the person nearest the pot should pour for everyone.

The tea is poured by the hostess or a nominated pourer. If leaf tea is served, a tea strainer is used. The tea is handed out one cup at a time after being poured, rather than pouring a few and handing them out in one go. The milk jug is passed around and each person adds their own milk. Use the spoon provided to stir the tea (without clinking against the cup) and, when finished, place it on the saucer. Cups are held by the handle – being careful not to raise the little finger – and placed back on the saucer between sips. Saucers remain on the table and are never raised when the cup is lifted up. Away from the table, raise the saucer.

Don't dunk biscuits in your tea unless in an informal setting, and don't slurp - even if it is piping hot.

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